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Try Neurofeedback

CJ Chilvers
CJ Chilvers
2 min read
Try Neurofeedback

This is where I am currently on my journey to decrease my anxiety — trying neurofeedback therapy.

What’s neurofeedback therapy?

It relies on the notion that positive feedback can train your brain to correct itself using audio-visual rewards. Practically speaking, it means you sit in front of a TV with electrodes on your head, headphones on your ears, and glasses flashing lights in your eyes for about 30 minutes per session.

Behind the scenes, your brain’s activity is being monitored. When a “bad” trend is recognized from the electrodes, a computer reacts in real time, sending signals that makes what you’re watching TV disappear (among other things you probably can’t perceive). In response, your brain tries to counteract the disappearance by firing up the “good” processes in the brain and the image reappears.

OK, that’s a very simplistic explanation of a complex therapy that takes doctors months of training to understand. But I’m a writer, not a doctor. I just see flickering lights and nature documentaries fading in and out.

In theory, this is all training the brain to stop firing up those “bad” processes so often in daily life. Over time, this is said to relieve a number disorders, including anxiety.

I’m on my 20th session or so right now, and I don’t have much to report other than it feels pretty good. I might put a stamp of approval on it in a while, but for now, I just wanted to let you know such a cool thing exists.

Also, I wanted to start out this 30-day blog posting spree with something a little unexpected.

This is me getting my first brain scan in May before starting neurofeedback therapy. I am now 40 pounds lighter and much happier. Does it have anything to do with the therapy? I don’t know, but I’m thinking it may have helped to put me in a better h…

This is me getting my first brain scan in May before starting neurofeedback therapy. I am now 40 pounds lighter and much happier. Does it have anything to do with the therapy? I don’t know, but I’m thinking it may have helped to put me in a better headspace by 10% or so, and maybe that played some role in kicking my butt into starting new, healthy habits.

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